Artists / Graeme Roger

Roger

Graeme Roger applied to Grizedale straight from college with a proposal to be a hermit in the forest. This was accepted and he took part in the local celebrations for the Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

The hermitage was supported by the tiny village of Satterthwaite who provided food and companionship, while Graeme built the fire that was to later consume the then ongoing GA project 'Forest Billboard' (at the villagers request). People regularly asked if Graeme was really as nice when he talked - the answer was no. Graeme was sacked from his post as hermit when he erronously said "hello" to a visitor. His next words after two weeks of silence in which to think up something profound were "I never liked the Queen anyway", a sentiment I think we might have guessed, what with Graeme being Scottish.

Graeme (as the Hermit) took part in 'Lawless' where he distilled the most disgusting alcohol for the car boot, and toured with 'Roadshow', producing further inebriates.

He eventually burned his own hermitage (a thatched garden shed) to a shell. The shed was decorated with a font designed by FAT that gave the appearance of a half timbered idyll but actually spelt out the words "F*** Off".

Graeme worked with Kevin Reid on the 'Roadshow' project, forming a collaborative practice that continued through to 'Lets Get Married Today', where the twosome acted as cowboy chauffeurs complete with buttless chaps and freshly waxed bottoms.

They further developed their relationship into a full blown collective involving their girlfriends Abby Loveland and Amy Malletta as a part of Prairie Oysters and their 'Trail of Tears' programme for 'Romantic Detachment' in New York and Cardiff.

The collective has continued and expanded in the guise of GANGHUT including additional collaborators and undertaking projects across the globe.

Asked to contribute his thoughts on 'Roadshow', Graeme stated that "Uff wa didna stick oor heeds too far oop urr arses wa shudbe owkay". Mark Beasley was delighted with this, restating it on several occasions in a Brummie accent.